OUR WORK

For three decades, we’ve been creating parklands, protecting and restoring wildlife, promoting regenerative agriculture, and proving that national parks are economic drivers for local communities.

The results speak for themselves: nearly 15 million acres protected, rebounding wildlife populations, and growing economic opportunities in park gateway communities.

| PARKS |

National parks provide durable protection for the planet’s fast-disappearing wildlands. But they also have the power to nurture our well-being and restore our ties to something greater than ourselves. Our vision for a vast network of parks on land and at sea promotes climate stability, restores biological corridors, and provides habitat for native species. Globally proven economic drivers, parks also provide lasting benefits to local communities.

Patagonia National Park

Pumalín Douglas Tompkins National Park

Patagonia National Park

Iberá National Park

El Impenetrable National Park

Marine National Parks

Península Mitre

Kawésqar National Park

Marine Conservation: Protecting Patagonia’s Coastal Waters

Patagonia Azul

Corcovado National Park

Yendegaia National Park

Melimoyu National Park

Isla Magdalena National Park

Perito Moreno National Park

Hornopirén National Park

Cerro Castillo National Park

Monte León National Park

Cape Froward National Park

| WILDLIFE PROGRAMS |

Since 2005, we have worked to safeguard and restore key species such as jaguars in Argentina’s wetlands and highly endangered huemul deer in Chile. A proven conservation strategy, rewilding regenerates complete and fully functioning ecosystems so that they can become selfsustaining with minimum human intervention. Native animals and plants return, making ecosystems whole again, and human communities are assured a dignified and stable future.

| Jaguar |

| Huemul Deer |

| Puma |

| Giant Otter |

| Lesser Rhea |

| Red-and-green Macaw |

| Giant Anteater |

| Guanaco |

| Bare-faced Curassow |

| Red-legged Seriema |

| Pampas Deer |

| Marsh Deer |

| Andean Condor |

| Austral Rail |

| Wolffsohn’s Viscacha |

| Collared Peccary |

| Hooded Grebe |

| Darwin’s Rhea |

Kristine McDivitt Tompkins

| Jaguar |

The jaguar (Panthera onca) is the largest feline in the Americas and is currently in critical danger of extinction in Argentina, after having lost 95 percent of its original distribution in the country due to hunting, habitat degradation, and loss of natural prey. The estimated jaguar population in Argentina is only about 200 individuals. The Rewilding Argentina team has been working urgently to return jaguars to their native range in the Iberá wetlands of Corrientes Province, launching our Jaguar Reintroduction Breeding Program in 2015 with the goal of raising jaguars in captivity that could be released and survive independently in the wild. The program also receives jaguars from other countries that are capable of being reintroduced to the wild. The program’s first two cubs were born in 2018—the first of their kind born in Iberá in more than half a century.

Debbie Ryker

| Huemul Deer |

A globally endangered species, the huemul or south Andean deer (Hippocamelus bisulcus) is a shy, forest-dwelling cervid native to the subantarctic forests and nearby steppes of Patagonia. Hunting, forage competition with livestock, introduced diseases, and persecution by domestic dogs have caused the huemul population to decline across its range. In the region of Patagonia National Park, huemuls were relatively common until the end of the nineteenth century according to historical accounts, although by that time the population was already suffering. Huemul deer still live in the boundary zones with Chile, just a few miles from Argentina. The Rewilding Argentina wildlife team is currently studying the feasibility of reintroducing this species, ultimately hoping to establish interconnected and secure huemul habitat in the transboundary region.

Esther Li

| Puma |

Pumas (Puma concolor) are the apex predator of Patagonia. Formerly abundant, puma numbers and range are constricted due to conflicts with ranchers. Widespread hunting and poisoning have restricted pumas to secure or remote habitat in mountains and canyons with rugged terrain, where they shelter. In Patagonia National Park–Argentina, the Rewilding Argentina wildlife team has started an active-management project for this species, hoping to prevent conflict with cattle and expand ecotourism based on wildlife observation. Ultimately, we expect the cougar to be seen not as a problem, but as an opportunity for economic development of neighboring communities.

Nicole Perman

| Giant Otter |

The giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis), a much larger relative of the river otter, can measure upto 6 feet in length. Formerly the top predator in the aquatic ecosystems of Corrientes Province, feeding on large fishes and yacaré caimans, giant otters were spotted on the Paraná River near the capital city of the province until the mid-1900s. The species is known to have inhabited the Iberá wetlands historically. This spectacular mammal is now extinct in Argentina, and our wildlife team is leading their reintroduction in Iberá. The first translocations of giant otters occurred in 2019.

Carolyn McCarthy

| Lesser Rhea |

The lesser rhea (Rhea pennata) is a running bird, common in the arid environments of southwestern Argentina. Along with guanacos, rheas are the dominant herbivores of Patagonia, and the lesser rhea was similarly affected by hunting (to obtain its leather and feathers). Population decline also stemmed from habitat degradation of the Patagonian grasslands, development of pastures with wire fences, and collection of its eggs. In Patagonia National Park–Argentina, our wildlife team is working to restore rhea populationlevels with a goal of eventually having source animals for reintroduction projects in other regions of Chile and Argentina where rheas are now extirpated.

Sawyer Downey

| Red-and-green Macaw |

Our wildlife team is reintroducing the green-winged macaw (Ara chloropterus), a native parrot that had disappeared from Iberá due to hunting for their vibrant feathers, to Iberá Park. Because the reintroduced birds were captive, not wild, individuals, project biologists must help the macaws hone the skills they’ll need to survive in freedom. After months of training—including flight exercises, predator recognition drills, and native fruit feeding—we’ve released 11 individuals into the wild. Some of them have already flown more than 60 kilometers from the release area, and have been spotted in nearby villages, where the local community celebrates their return. This is the first time a locally extinct bird is being reintroduced in the history of Argentina.

Heather Kim

| Giant Anteater |

One of the most striking and peculiar mammals of Argentina, the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) has a long snout without teeth, and a very long tongue that it uses to obtain its primary food source: ants and termites. Anteaters only have one offspring per year, and thus are sensitive to human persecution as well as to habitat loss. Considered in danger of extinction in Argentina, giant anteaters were the first missing species that our wildlife team reintroduced in Iberá Park. Since the anteater reintroduction program’s launch in 2007, more than 100 orphan anteaters—whose mothers were victims of poaching—have been rescued and released in the wild and three new local populations have been established.

Heather Kim

| Guanaco |

The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is the largest and most abundant herbivore of the arid and semi-arid zones of Argentina, including the Patagonia steppe and neighboring zones of subantarctic forests. Guanacos played a central role in early human settlement of this region, about 12,000 years ago. The once-spectacular migratory movements are now lost, mainly because of hunting and habitat deterioration due to more than a century of overgrazing by domestic livestock. In Patagonia National Park–Argentina, our wildlife team is working to restore healthy populations of this keystone species, thus promoting ecological recovery and fostering ecotourism.

Heather Kim

| Bare-faced Curassow |

The bare-faced curassow (Crax fasciolata) is the largest galliform bird in Argentina. It formerly inhabited the northeastern part of the country but has now largely disappeared due to the loss and degradation of its jungle habitat, and also due to being hunted for meat. Today the curassow survives only in low numbers in parts of its native range in northern Argentina. It is a great consumer and disperser of fruits and seeds, helping to restore the forest it inhabits. The Rewilding Argentina wildlife program is working on the initial stage of a reintroduction project for this species at Iberá Park.

Heather Kim

| Red-legged Seriema |

The red-legged seriema (Seriema cristata) is a grassland bird that primarily moves by walking, but is able to fly. It feeds upon and hence controls population numbers of worms, spiders, insects, and small vertebrates such as lizards, snakes, and rodents. The species has disappeared from large sectors of its former range in central and northern Argentina. It survives in the southeast corner of Corrientes Province, but in diminished numbers. At the Rewilding Argentina headquarters at Iberá Park, a reintroduction project of this species is in an experimental phase.

Heather Kim

| Pampas Deer |

It is estimated that only about 2,000 pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) — formerly one of the most abundant herbivores in the Argentine grasslands— remain in Argentina. Their habitat, which includes the grasslands (or “pampas”) bordering the Iberá wetlands, has been diminished due to cattle ranching and industrial forestry. Persecution by dogs is also a source of mortality and displacement. Our goal is to assure the long-term survival of pampas deer in Corrientes Province, and to promote their return to the interior of Iberá. Having reintroduced the species to areas where it was previously extirpated, the population today is an estimated 120 to 150 individuals (up from 0), and a second nucleus has been established in our privately managed Rincón del Socorro reserve. Pampas deer reintroduced in Iberá now constitute the fifth population of the country, the third most numerous, and the largest population that is secure within a protected area.

Heather Kim

| Marsh Deer |

Marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), the largest cervid of South America, inhabits floodable regions—riparian zones of rivers, streams, lagoons, swamps, and reservoirs—of central and northern Argentina in the Paraná and Uruguay River basins. Nowadays, the species survives only in the Iberá wetlands and nearby zones of the Paraná Delta and the eastern Chaco and Formosa provinces. Since the creation of Iberá Park, the population has recovered considerably, now numbering roughly 10,000 individuals. Currently, the Rewilding Argentina team is planning to reintroduce this species into El Impenetrable National Park, where it is extinct. The founding individuals for that future population will be translocated from Iberá Park.

Heather Kim

| Andean Condor |

The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) is the largest flying scavenger in the world, with a wingspan that can measure 9 feet wide. Poisoning directed at cougars and foxes also kills Andean condors throughout their range. In Patagonia National Park–Argentina, our wildlife team is starting a condor study, with the objective of having a better understanding of their movements and habits; this knowledge about condors’ use of their habitat should bolster both conservation and ecotourism activities.

Heather Kim

| Austral Rail |

The austral rail (Rallus antarcticus) is an enigmatic and little-known bird that was considered extinct for several decades until its rediscovery in 1998. It inhabits a very restricted range and specific habitat—reed beds along water bodies—which are typically scarce in the arid Patagonian steppe. The species has declined due to livestock overgrazing and associated habitat degradation. In Patagonia Park–Argentina, our team is starting to actively manage for this species by removing cattle, helping restore reed beds, and translocating individual birds that will recolonize their riparian habitat.

Heather Kim

| Wolffsohn’s Viscacha |

The Wolffsohn’s viscacha (Lagidium wolffsohni) is an herbivorous mammal exclusively distributed in the west side of the Argentine province of Santa Cruz and neighboring zones of Chile. It is restricted to steep, rocky canyon walls where it is often observed getting a little bit of sunlight. The species has disappeared from some of its preferred habitat due to hunting and forage competition with livestock. In Patagonia National Park, our wildlife program team is starting a management project for this species that will support expansion of viscachas to their former range via translocations.

Heather Kim

| Collared Peccary |

The collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) is a distant relative of domestic pigs and lives in small groups of between 5 and 15 individuals. Because peccaries feed primarily on fruits and roots, they play a key role in dispersing seeds of native plants. Healthy populations of the animal are still found in Argentina although the species has been lost in many regions including Corrientes Province, largely due to hunting and forest clearcutting during the middle of the twentieth century. Since starting this species reintroduction program, we’ve established one self-sustaining population and are in the process of creating three others.

Heather Kim

| Hooded Grebe |

The hooded grebe (Podiceps gallardoi) is a diving bird, endemic to Santa Cruz Province, Argentina, and is considered critically endangered. During summertime this beautiful bird inhabits the lagoons located on the plateau of the Buenos Aires Lake within Patagonia National Park–Argentina, where it performs its spectacular courtship dance and seeks to reproduce. Rewilding Argentina’s wildlife team has collaborated with CONICET and Aves Argentinas to recover populations of the grebe. To this end, we provided financial support to operate a biological station that functions as a base to monitor and host a human caretaker to safeguard the breeding colonies.

Heather Kim

| Darwin’s Rhea |

Darwin’s rheas (Rhea pennatapennata), colloquially known as “Ñandú,” are native to Patagonia’s steppe grasslands. These ostrich-like birds are considered endangered in Chile as a result of hunting, largely for their feathers and eggs; nest destruction and habitat loss have also affected reproductive success. Through a captive breeding effort begun in 2015, when less than 20 individual rheas occupied the grasslands of the Chacabuco Valley, our Wildlife Program team at Patagonia National Park is working to augment and expand that relict population with good success. By 2020 almost 60 rheas inhabited the eastern sector of the park and their distribution area has expanded by more than 30 percent.

EXPLORE | Our Work |

Tompkins Conservation is a strategic collaborator of its offspring nonprofits Rewilding Chile and Rewilding Argentina.

CHILE

ARGENTINA


National parks are the gold standard of conservation in these days of severe ecological crisis.

—Douglas Tompkins

In ways large and small, as individuals and groups, we have the power to reorient the trajectory of life on Earth toward beauty, diversity, wildness, and health.