Category Archives: Park Creation

Pumalín National Park to Carry the Name of its Founder, Douglas Tompkins

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Photo: James Q Martin

President of Chile Recognizes Tompkins Conservation Founder by Naming New National Park in His Honor

PRESS RELEASE

February 27, 2018 — La Moneda Palace, Santiago, Chile

At the La Moneda Palace in Santiago, Chile, Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and Kristine McDivitt Tompkins, President of Tompkins Conservation, signed the decree to create “Pumalín National Park – Douglas R. Tompkins.” This marks the final act in creating the network of parks of Chilean Patagonia, which establishes over 10 million acres of new national parklands and includes what has been billed as the largest donation of land from a private entity to a country in history. With today’s signing and naming ceremony, the government of Chile recognizes Douglas Tompkins’ legacy by giving his first and most iconic conservation philanthropy project his name.

Kristine McDivitt Tompkins stated: “On behalf of our family and the Tompkins Conservation teams in Chile, Argentina, and the United States, I feel honored that Doug’s vision to create national parks is recognized in a permanent way, by putting his name on his beloved Pumalín Park.”

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Douglas Rainsford Tompkins, 1943-2015. Photo: Tompkins Conservation

Douglas Tompkins began the creation of Pumalín in 1992 by buying large tracts of land to protect the region’s pristine temperate rainforests. Today Pumalín encompasses 994,000 acres—larger than Yosemite National Park—including almost 725,000 acres donated by Tompkins Conservation. The park stretches from the heart of the Andes Mountains to the fjords of the Pacific Coast and harbors the endangered Alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides), some of the oldest living trees on the planet. Located on the scenic Carretera Austral, Pumalín welcomes visitors from Chile and around the world to experience its natural wonders via the extensive network of trails, campgrounds, cabins, and other facilities.

It is remarkable that Doug’s legacy and dedication to conservation is being honored today at the highest level of the Chilean government, as his efforts and intentions were met with opposition and controversy initially. The tradition of environmental philanthropy was not customary, and as a result, locals were skeptical when they learned of foreigners acquiring vast areas of land for conservation. Over the years, though, as the Tompkinses demonstrated their intentions and communities began to benefit, skepticism subsided. Today, Pumalín and Tompkins Conservation’s other projects like Patagonia Park and Iberá Park in Argentina are not only widely recognized and visited by tourists from all over the world, but as a consequence of conservation, they are becoming sources of economic vitality for their surrounding areas.

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Lago Negro, Pumalín Park. Photo: James Q Martin

Kristine McDivitt Tompkins added: “We never imagined that this conservation partnership, between the government of Chile and Tompkins Conservation, would generate the overwhelmingly positive reaction at a national and international level that it has. However, now is when the real work begins. We have to embrace these national parks as our own. We have to care for them, defend them from harm…To imagine a future in which human communities thrive and the non-human world flourishes and evolves according to its natural course… This depends on each one of us.”

Press Contact:

Erin Louie Billman

Global Communications Director, Tompkins Conservation

louie@tompkinsconservation.org

About Tompkins Conservation: Tompkins Conservation collaborates with the governments of Chile and Argentina, local organizations, and communities to create national parks—places of beauty, abundant wildlife, and recreation that serve as sources of income and pride to neighboring communities and the entire nation. For more information see www.tompkinsconservation.org/who_we_are or visit us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Tompkins Conservation was founded by Kristine and Douglas (1943–2015) Tompkins, business leaders from iconic American clothing brands including The North Face, Esprit, and Patagonia, Inc., who changed the course of their lives more than 25 years ago to devote their funds, time, and passion to fight the biggest crisis in the world: biodiversity loss. The Tompkinses ultimately concluded that creating large national parks where evolutionary processes could take their course was the most effective way to combat this loss. National parks represent the “gold standard” of biodiversity conservation, offering a unique set of ecological attributes, cultural values, ​​and economic benefits to local communities, while also guaranteeing long-term conservation. Tompkins Conservation is the leader in the Americas in what is known as “rewilding,” restoring natural ecosystems and reintroducing wildlife that has disappeared from a region because of human pressures.  

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President of Chile and CEO of Tompkins Conservation Sign Decrees Creating 10 Million Acres of New National Parks

This includes Tompkins Conservation’s two flagship parks, Patagonia and Pumalín

PRESS RELEASE

January 29, 2018 — Patagonia Park, Chile

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and Kristine McDivitt Tompkins, President and CEO of Tompkins Conservation, today signed the decrees creating Pumalín National Park and Patagonia National Park Chile. The one million acres and world-class infrastructure they contain have been billed as the largest donation of land from a private entity to a country.

This marks the culmination of the pledge that President Michelle Bachelet and Kristine McDivitt Tompkins signed in March 2017 to create a network of five new national parks in Chile and the expansion of three others. Together, they are adding a total of more than 10 million acres of new national parklands to Chile, with one million acres of land from Tompkins Conservation and an additional 9 million acres of federal land from Chile. For scale, that is more than three times the size of Yosemite and Yellowstone combined, or approximately the size of the country of Switzerland.

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The Chacabuco Valley, Patagonia Park. Photo: James Q Martin

The signing of these decrees cements Chile as one of the global leaders in conservation today, a vision which President Bachelet touched on in her speech today. “With these beautiful lands, their forests, their rich ecosystems, we…expand the network of parks to more than 10 million acres. Thus, national parklands in Chile will increase by 38.5% to account for 81.1% of Chile’s protected areas.”

“I am proud of my husband Doug and his vision which continues to guide us, in addition to our entire team, for completing these two national parks and the broader network, a major milestone of our first 25 years of work,” Kristine Tompkins said. “While we will continue to help promote and safeguard these parks, we are beginning to turn our attention to more new conservation and rewilding projects in Chile and Argentina as we work to save and restore big, wild and connected ecosystems.”

Patagonia National Park Chile and Pumalín National Park will be key destinations in the network of parks of Chilean Patagonia. These parks are already open to the public, welcoming visitors from Chile and around the world to experience Patagonia’s natural beauty, which will now be permanently protected for all visitors and the creatures that call these parks home.

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Pumalín Park. Photo: James Q Martin

From its inception, Tompkins Conservation’s objective has been to donate privately acquired land to parks systems to be protected at the highest level of conservation for generations to come. To date, the organization and its partners have protected roughly 13 million acres of land to parks systems in Chile and Argentina, where they have worked with local and national governments, nongovernmental organizations, scientists, activists, conservationists and their local staff to achieve permanent conservation.

About Tompkins Conservation: Tompkins Conservation collaborates with the governments of Chile and Argentina, local organizations, and communities to create national parks— places of beauty, abundant wildlife, and recreation that serve as sources of income and pride to neighboring communities and the entire nation. For more information see tompkinsconservation.org/whoweare or visit us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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Pumalín Park. Photo: James Q Martin

Tompkins Conservation was founded by Kristine and Douglas (1943–2015) Tompkins, business leaders from iconic American clothing brands including The North Face, Esprit, and Patagonia, Inc., who changed the course of their lives more than 25 years ago to devote their funds, time, and passion to fight the biggest crisis in the world: biodiversity loss. After careful analysis, Kristine and Douglas concluded that creating large national parks where evolutionary processes could take their course was the most effective way to combat this loss. National parks represent the “gold standard” of biodiversity conservation, offering a unique set of ecological attributes, cultural values, ​​and economic benefits to local communities, while also guaranteeing long-term conservation. Tompkins Conservation is the leader in the Americas in what is known as “rewilding,” restoring natural ecosystems and reintroducing wildlife that has disappeared from a region because of human pressures.

Press Contact:

Alison Kelman

Communications Director

alison.kelman@tompkinsconservation.org

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Patagonia Park. Photo: James Q Martin

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Cerro Castillo Becomes a National Park; Isla Magdalena is Expanded

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Cerro Castillo National Park. Photo: Jimmy Chin

On October 2, on Chile’s National Environment Day, President Michelle Bachelet signed the decree creating Cerro Castillo National Park and extending Isla Magdalena National Park. The re-categorization of Cerro Castillo National Park, formerly a national reserve, will not only increase the protection status of this refuge for huemul deer, but will also protect one of the most distinctive landscapes in the region of Aysén. This decree will also create a destination for tourists that will directly benefit the towns of Puerto Ibáñez and Villa Cerro Castillo.

With the creation and expansion of these two parks, the process initiated by the Protocol of Agreement signed on March 15, 2017 between the Government and Tompkins Conservation has officially started. The Protocol calls for the creation of the “Network of National Parks of Chilean Patagonia,” which will add more than 10 million acres of national parklands. This is the largest creation of national parks in the last 50 years; a public-private effort, an historic legacy and hopefully an impetus for the consolidation of a system of protected areas on a global level.

As said by the President during the signing of these decrees, “Someone might ask: Is this an extravagance or a luxury, perhaps?” Like her, we think not, because this protection makes these places available to national and foreign visitors and opens up opportunities for economic development for the surrounding towns, through nature tourism and associated services.

Tourism stands as the main economic driver and the most sustainable option for these regions. National parks are the best way to increase the value of a landscape, and to make known the international recognition and to make known these attributes from a conservation instrument of long tradition and international recognition.

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Staff Spotlight: Ignacio Jiménez Pérez, CLT Conservation Director

_CJR6869Name: Ignacio Jiménez Pérez

Role: Conservation Director, CLT Argentina

Year joined CLT: 2005

Hometown: Valencia, Spain

Main area of study: “Institutional Ecology,” which studies how organizational arrangements can make conservation more effective

Ignacio came to CLT Argentina over ten years ago with a wealth of knowledge and experience in the field of wildlife conservation. Beginning his career with a degree in Animal Biology from the Universidad de Valencia in Spain, and a Masters in Wildlife Management and Conservation from the Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica, Ignacio has gained decades of field research and management experience from around the world. From the study and management of manatees in Costa Rica and Nicaragua to the assessment of endangered species protection in Spain, Ignacio’s work to research, manage and restore wildlife has put him at the top of his field. Also a professor, Ignacio has taught well over 20 courses in Spain, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Argentina, and Chile about interdisciplinary issues related to conservation. His research and conservation efforts have been featured in various scientific journals, books, and other publications.

Beginning in 2005, Ignacio’s work with CLT initially focused on endangered species recovery in the Iberá wetlands, which is home to species such as the giant anteater, pampas deer, and jaguar. Now taking on a more communications-based role, Ignacio is still the leading authority on rewilding in the Iberá region. We had the chance to ask Ignacio a few key questions about his path to CLT and what inspires him in his work today. Below is our conversation:

Q: How did you first get involved with The Conservation Land Trust?

A: I was travelling with my Argentinean girlfriend (now my wife and mother of two beautiful, wild daughters) through Pumalín in January 2005. I had just moved to Argentina from Costa Rica and was looking for some exciting conservation work to do. While I was at the cozy café at Caleta Gonzalo I was wondering, what is this organization that is trying to manage a private reserve as a top-notch national park? Then I saw the book about the 10 first years of CLT. Going through the pages I discovered that they had a project in a place called Iberá in Argentina, which sounded slightly familiar to me. Then I saw that they were planning on reintroducing six species of mammals. I knew that nobody had tried something like that in South America before, and I thought, “these guys are crazy!” And then, “if someone can do this, maybe it’s them.” A few months later I got in contact with Sofía Heinonen, who was just starting a conservation team and looking for someone with experience in endangered species recovery. The rest, as they say, is history!

Q: Can you please explain a bit about your role at CLT Argentina?

A: From 2005 to 2015 I was in charge of coordinating our rewilding program aimed at reintroducing locally extirpated species. By 2015 it was obvious that my role was getting too broad, because I had to manage a growing team of professionals who were actually in charge if the animals, getting all the permits from authorities, which is one of the toughest jobs in conservation, and also managing communication, fundraising, and training. It was just too much. With Sofía, our Director in Argentina, we decided to split the job and look for a person who would be mostly focused on the actual rewilding, while I would focus more on strategic communication and institutional issues for all of CLT Argentina.

Q: What does rewilding mean to you?

A: It means working hard to get things better in the natural world, not only avoiding that they get worse. It’s something proactive and inspiring, instead of just being reactive and “on the defensive.” Through rewilding we can really improve the state of the natural ecosystems that we are entrusted to care for, and also inspire people to support conservation!

Q: Can you explain a bit about Iberá’s jaguar reintroduction program? What are the program’s goals for 2017?

A: The jaguar program in Iberá is the apex of the Iberá Rewilding Program, both because it is the most difficult species to work with (you don’t want to work with an animal that it’s either hated/feared or loved, with no space in between!) and because it implies bringing back one the most important pieces of the whole ecosystem (i.e. it’s a top predator; like the “dome” of this “natural cathedral” that is the Iberá landscape). In the end we were surprised by the high level of support of the local population, because they see jaguars as a “vanished distant relative” since many local gauchos compare themselves with jaguars, as part of their cultural and natural heritage.

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Naguel and Tobuna, Iberá Park’s first two jaguars to the Jaguar Breeding Center. Photo: CLT Argentina

Q: You were recently working in South Africa. Can you explain a bit about what you were doing there?

A: I went to South Africa both for a family experience and for a professional goal. At the family level it was a great opportunity for my daughters (8 and 9 years old) to live in another culture, improve their English and enjoy amazing wildlife and landscapes. For the family as a whole, it was extremely satisfying. At the professional level, through my job in rewilding in Iberá (and my personal interest in organizational issues) I came to discover that Southern Africa, as a region, was decades ahead of the rest of the world regarding the restoration of extirpated populations of large animals. Knowing this, I couldn’t help but travel there to learn and bring that practical knowledge to South America!

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Ignacio with Carito (one of CLT wildlife veterinarians) during a visit to a rhino conservation project in South Africa. Photo: Ignacio Jiménez Pérez

Q: What does Iberá becoming a National Park mean for the park’s rewilding initiatives?

A: The Iberá Program was the result of Dougs and Kris’ vision from the beginning, and this was very clear: making a vast national park that could stand the test of time and bring back the missing ecological pieces (i.e. extirpated fauna). Without the park and its long-term legal protection, there would be no rewilding, because there would be no protected habitat for the reintroduced giant anteaters, pampas deer, tapirs, jaguars, etc.

The project that inspires me the most nowadays, is a book that we are finishing that combines more than two decades of personal experience managing, visiting, studying and learning from conservation programs in four continents. In CLT Argentina we privately call this book “The Manual,” since it combines most of the experience gained in 25 years of Tompkins Conservation with what we have learned working in and visiting other conservation programs. We believe that we have been able to develop a ground-proofed method to create and manage protected areas and rewild large areas of the planet.

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Watching mountain gorillas in Rwanda. Photo: Ignacio Jiménez Pérez

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On Sale for a Limited Time: Parklands Book Series

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On behalf of Conservacion Patagonica and the Conservation Land Trust, the Tompkins Conservation publishing team is producing an ongoing series of large, photo-format books on parks and conservation philanthropy. Previously published volumes include Wildlands Philanthropy, Corcovado National Park, Monte León National Park, Perito Moreno National Park, Yendegaia National Park, and Esteros del Iberá. In development as of 2017 are volumes on Pumalín Park and Chile’s future Patagonia National Park. The series is intended to increase awareness of conservation history, to celebrate the key people who established parks and protected wildlife, and to support nongovernmental organizations working for land and wildlife conservation, primarily in Argentina and Chile. These countries have a rich, century-long history of park creation, and various volumes in the parklands series will share with the world the fine conservation examples that Argentina and Chile have already protected—or might someday safeguard—in their national park systems.

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Yendegaia National Park


In honor of the recent pledge by Tompkins Conservation and the government of Chile to create 10 million acres of new national parklands, publishing partner Goff Books is offering the Parklands Books at 50% for a limited time, or purchase the entire series of five books for $125


Since releasing its first title, Clearcut: The Tragedy of Industrial Forestry (with Sierra Club Books) in 1993, the Tompkins Conservation publishing program has conceived, produced, and funded more than 25 books on conservation topics, anchored by a series of large-format volumes. Following in a tradition pioneered by conservationist David Brower who used exhibit format books to support the Sierra Club’s advocacy work in the 1960s, the Tompkins Conservation staff and colleagues have modernized the genre, producing award-winning books to inspire and educate activists.

We are pleased to share this special offer in conjunction with the biggest announcement in our organization’s history. Thank you for celebrating the protection of wild places.


CORCOVADO Cover

Corcovado National Park Original price $75, Sale price $37.50

In Corcovado National Park, renowned landscape photographer Antonio Vizcaíno captures the beauty and diversity of a magical setting almost untouched by modern humans. With a foreword by President Lagos and essays by other principals in the park’s creation, Corcovado National Park explores the natural wonders of an extraordinary place and tells the stories of the conservationists who made certain it would remain a bastion of wild nature held in trust by the Chilean people for future generations.

MONTE LEON Cover 2Monté Leon National Park Original price $75, Sale price $37.50

Endless sky, rock, and water: Where the arid grasslands of southern Argentina meet the Atlantic Ocean, the wild winds and waters of Patagonia have sculpted a magical landscape. This wonderland is Monte León National Park. Established in 2002 through public–private collaboration, the park’s creation was prompted by a gift from Kristine Tompkins, the former CEO of the clothing company named for this legendary region at the bottom of the Earth.

Screen ShotPerito Moreno National Park Original price $150, Sale price $75

In a region so alluring that is has become synonymous with beauty at the end of the Earth, Perito Moreno National Park is an icon of Patagonia. Named in honor of revered early conservationist Perito Moreno, the “John Muir of Argentina,” this relatively little visited park is a magnet for intrepid travelers and ambitious alpinists. This book presents a stunning collection of images of the park by renowned landscape photographer Antonio Vizcaíno with supporting essays from experts on the park’s natural and cultural history, this elegant volume offers an armchair tour of one of the world’s most scenic and unsullied landscapes.

140910 YDG Dust Cover ENGLISH-1 croppedYendegaia National Park Original price $150, Sale price $75

Yendegaia National Park offers a visually spectacular tour of one of Earth’s most remote and scenic national parks. In Chilean Patagonia on the grand island of Tierra del Fuego, the new park—designated in 2014—was prompted by a donation of private land to the Chilean park system. When combined with adjacent federal land, the new protected area covers some 372,000 acres, and forms a habitat linkage between existing national parks in Chile and Argentina. Thus the new Yendegaia National Park has helped establish one of the planet’s most significant transboundary protected areas, or “peace parks.”

PrintEsteros del Iberá Original price $150, Sale price $75

A wonderland of sky, water, grass, and birdsong, the Iberá marshlands of Corrientes Province are the preeminent wildlife habitat in Argentina and a globally important natural treasure. A native son of Corrientes, world-class nature photographer Juan Ramón Díaz Colodrero, his dazzling images put the reader into the heart of the Iberá’s life-affirming beauty. Supporting essays by leading regional conservationists and other experts illuminate the Iberá’s diverse natural communities and distinctive human culture. While the area is remarkably unspoiled, innovative conservation projects are augmenting wildlife populations and returning missing native species—such as the giant anteater and the jaguar—to their rightful homes in the landscape of shining waters.


To purchase all five books for $125, please email sales@oroeditions.com and provide your name and telephone number (postage charged separately).


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