Landscape Restoration


While it is vitally important to protect existing wilderness areas, in most parts of the planet, ensuring the future health of ecosystems requires reversing human degradation through some type of restoration work. We marvel at the healing powers of Nature, witnessing how degraded landscapes rebound when exploitive activities end and the land has time to recover.

Proactive measures can jumpstart and accelerate these natural processes of recovery. Opportunities abound to help nurse wounded landscapes back to health by protecting habitat, removing nonnative species, reintroducing missing wildlife, and facilitating the reestablishment of ecosystem processes on a landscape scale. We call ecological restoration a “growth industry.” Almost anywhere, the passionate conservationist can see chances to bring biological vitality back to degraded landscapes. Rehabilitating the natural world will always be a good investment of time and resources.

Each of our flagship parklands projects includes a major landscape restoration initiative. Remote and spectacular as these landscapes are, each has suffered from improper human use, making it a conservation target in the first place. At the Pumalín Park project, The Conservation Land Trust developed the “Alerce 3000” initiative to restore these millennia-old giant trees, a key species of the Valdivian temperate rainforest. Conservacion Patagonica’s Patagonia National Park project is one of the largest grassland restoration initiatives in the world, recovering the overgrazed Patagonian steppe to productive wildlife habitat. At the Iberá project, The Conservation Land Trust focuses on repairing damage from overgrazing and non-native forestry and establishing proper grazing regimes that support healthy grasslands.

Here you see a before and after example of the landscape restoration that took place in Fundo Vodudahue, one of our farms adjacent to the Pumalín Park in Chile:

Another example of our landscape restoration work, this one in Fundo Las Lomas:

Restoration work taken place in El Amarillo:

 

Learn more about our landscape restoration projects:

 

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